Gros Morne National Park – 2014

During my residency in Gros Morne National Park, Newfoundland, I investigated the local geology, plate tectonics and local marine biology. I explored the park, did a lot of writing, research and began a new body of work inspired by my experiences with the ecology and geology of the park. I did a lot of beachcombing in the communities, collecting objects and ocean detritus and creating embroidered handmade paper and pig intestine pieces. I became quite interested in the different methods people had of understanding and explaining geologic time, especially the ones that involved measuring it on our own bodies – like how the tectonic plates move at the same speed of the growth of our fingernails. The new body of work I began in Gros Morne National Park investigates decomposition, textures, surfaces and our understanding of geologic time. Living in the park for five weeks was a very raw and physical experience for me, and I felt constantly in touch with vibrant colours, textures, sensations, weather and the chaotic formations of the land. Thanks to Parks Canada and the Rooms Gallery for this amazing and inspiring experience.

Me after the boat ride in Western Brook Pond

Heather Komus after a boat ride in Western Brook Pond

Near a beach where I often went beachcombing

Near a beach where I often went beachcombing

Sea stacks at Green Gardens

Sea stacks at Green Gardens

Untitled Embroidery on handmade paper, pig intestine, seaweed, shells, fish bones, found objects Variable dimensions 2014

Untitled
Embroidery on handmade paper, pig intestine, seaweed, shells, fish bones, found objects
Variable dimensions
2014

Notochord Rock, embroidery on pig intestine and handmade paper 12.5” x 7” x 7.5” 2014

Notochord
Rock, embroidery on pig intestine and handmade paper
12.5” x 7” x 7.5”
2014

Tunicate Rock, embroidery on pig intestine, Powerade lid 12” x 8” x 7” 2014

Tunicate
Rock, embroidery on pig intestine, Powerade lid
12” x 8” x 7”
2014